Puget Sound Section

Communicating Climate Science: A Workshop for Chemists

There is a need to educate scientists and non-scientists alike in the causes and implications of climate change. Much of the science of climate change is based on chemical principles: spectroscopy, combustion, carbon cycle, and stoichiometry are some examples. But many chemists lack the confidence to explain these topics to non-scientists. (learn more about climate change here)

On Oct. 26th, 2013 the Puget Sound Section of the American Chemical Society will host a Workshop on climate change communication specifically geared to chemists.The workshop will connect expert scientists in climate change to chemists interested in communicating climate change to the general public. The goals of the workshop are to

(1) to develop a presentation that can be used by chemists in a speaker’s bureau to educate chemists and the general public (adults) on common climate change misconceptions, and 

(2) develop interactive informal activities that engage younger audiences and families in climate science topics in a non-confrontational way.  

The event will take place on Saturday, Oct. 26th in the Boeing Room of the Seattle University Lemieux Library and Learning Commons.

RSVP's are required. 

 

Tentative Schedule

Morning Session: (9am -noon)

 Learn the chemical principles behind climate change 

The workshop on climate change communication will NOT be another climate lecture, it will be a hands-on interactive workshop to help you become more comfortable discussing the principles of climate change. In the morning session, you will work with skilled climate communicator Dr.Peter Mahaffy of the King’s University. Dr. Mahaffy and his colleague Dr. Brian Martin have developed a set of online tutorials that explain basic principles of climate change. He will show people how to use these tools to develop greater understanding of climate principles.

 

Afternoon Session: (1:30-5 pm)

Develop tools to help communicate climate change science to non-scientists 

In the afternoon, you will begin development of tools that can be used to communicate climate science principles with non-scientists. Participants have the option to work on one of two projects

(1)Professional chemists: Develop a presentation that can be used by chemists in a speaker’s bureau to educate chemists and the general public (adults) on common climate change misconceptions.

(2) Undergraduate chemists: Develop an interactive game that engages younger audiences and families in climate science topics in a non-confrontational way. The grant director was inspired by the Carbon Cycle game.  

The afternoon session will also feature a tour of the Bullitt Center: Greenest Commercial Building in the World!  

Who can attend? This event is free and open to all people with an interest in the chemical sciences from undergraduates to retirees. Attendance is limited to 55 people. Priority is given to members of the American Chemical Society. College chem clubs are encouraged to attend but attendance will be limited to 2-3 per institution unless space becomes available. RSVP here.  

Questions?  Email the grant director: Charity Flener Lovitt (lovittc@seattleu.edu)

 

The Puget Sound Chemist